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Thread: Lincoln fwd tire shoulder wear

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cape Coral, Fl.
    Posts
    5

    Default Lincoln fwd tire shoulder wear

    1) I haven't found a repair manual for my 1999 Continental front wheel drive. I have a suspension problem. Is it Like any other vehicle?

    2) The inside shoulders of the tire wore through to the core leaving plenty of tread. The FIRESTONE shop says there is no camber
    adjustment on this vehicle. By merely eyeballing I can see negative camber. Do you know if there is a fix for this problem? Is there a height adjustment or what?

    Thanks,

    aquaries

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Posts
    17

    Default

    go to tire kingdom or to a place you know alot about the lincolns expecially your model. my sugetion is to wiggle each tire when you jack it up it would give you a sign that the ball joints ang the stabiliser bar links are bad. if the wheels dont wiggle it could be some thing a little more serius like the a arms could be bent but go to anouther place that do alot of alieghnments in there shop. it sounds like the firestone shop didnt know where to look to fix your vehicles alignment

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cape Coral, Fl.
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Actually I have been to tire kingdom and had the ball joints replaced. This negative camber remains.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,850

    Default

    Hi aquaries1,

    Actually there is a provision for camber/caster adjustment on that vehicle. At the top of each strut tower there is an "alignment plate." They are spot-welded in place and the welds must be drilled out to allow for any changes in camber/caster. Bolts are installed in place of the spot welds after the adjustments are made. Of course, the alignment technician must make sure that there are no bent or worn components (hub/bearing assemblies included) before he performs this procedure, as it will not compensate for damage or wear. My suggestion is to call around and find an alignment shop familiar with this operation.

  5. #5
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cape Coral, Fl.
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by admin View Post
    Hi aquaries1,

    Actually there is a provision for camber/caster adjustment on that vehicle. At the top of each strut tower there is an "alignment plate." They are spot-welded in place and the welds must be drilled out to allow for any changes in camber/caster. Bolts are installed in place of the spot welds after the adjustments are made. Of course, the alignment technician must make sure that there are no bent or worn components (hub/bearing assemblies included) before he performs this procedure, as it will not compensate for damage or wear. My suggestion is to call around and find an alignment shop familiar with this operation.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cape Coral, Fl.
    Posts
    5

    Question

    Thanks for the heads up.

    Do you think this procedure is better than new springs?

  7. #7
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,850

    Default

    Well, like I said, it isn't a substitute for worn parts. If it has been determined that the springs are sagging, they should be replaced, then the alignment should be checked and if necessary, adjusted.

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Feb 2010
    Location
    Cape Coral, Fl.
    Posts
    5

    Default

    Quote Originally Posted by admin View Post
    Hi aquaries1,

    Actually there is a provision for camber/caster adjustment on that vehicle. At the top of each strut tower there is an "alignment plate." They are spot-welded in place and the welds must be drilled out to allow for any changes in camber/caster. Bolts are installed in place of the spot welds after the adjustments are made. Of course, the alignment technician must make sure that there are no bent or worn components (hub/bearing assemblies included) before he performs this procedure, as it will not compensate for damage or wear. My suggestion is to call around and find an alignment shop familiar with this operation.

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