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Thread: Haynes manual 25026, Chapter 4, section 3, 2001 Chrysler Concord, 2.7L, fuel pressure?

  1. #1
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    May 2009
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    Default Haynes manual 25026, Chapter 4, section 3, 2001 Chrysler Concord, 2.7L, fuel pressure?

    I need to measure the fuel pressure after the pump or before ther rail. The illustration on page 4-3 #3.6b is very vague. The location where the "adapter hose" should go, can not be identified, nor the original hose that goes into a T fitting and disappears to the bottom right. Four people including two engineers were unsuccesful in correlating the fuel line illustration with the actual engine layout. The fuel line could not be identified.
    Please help with suggestions not limited to line material, outside dimension, color,and routing.
    Thanks

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Hi garyspang,

    Take a look at illustration 15.6 in Chapter 4; that's the fuel feed line at the fuel rail - it's near the back of the left (driver's side) valve cover. The adapter for the pressure gauge goes there. It has to have a fitting on each end that will connect with the fuel line and the feed hose.

  3. #3
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    May 2009
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    3

    Default Chrysler 2.7L fuel pressure, chapter 4

    Figure 15.6 was tried. Fig 15.6 must be the 3.2/3.5L engine. It does not correlate with my engine or to figure 1.1 which is the 2.7L engine in question.
    Thanks for trying.

    The only hint I have so fahr is the large center line on the right of figure 5.9. It appears to have a two tab fitting. Since it also appears to be below the tank, I am hesitant to test there because it may dump gasoline by syphoning action during a lengthy test gauge attachment process.

    Maybe a conclusion can be inferred from the symotoms:

    The key is turned and the fuel pump runs for about one second.
    The key is turned further and the starter rotates the engine and the engine fires almost immediately.
    The engine idles for about a minute (on occasion it studders and is immediately increased in revs and settles back down to idle) and in another five seconds or so it stops.
    No Error codes.
    Immediate restarts are not possible. Engine rotates with an occasional sputter but never fires.
    After waiting for about one minute, the above process can be repeated almost verbatum again and again.

    To me it acts as if the fuel filter is clogged. The fuel pressure results will clarify this and determine wether or not the entire fuel tank has to be removed since the filter/regulator is intregal with the fuel pump.
    Thanks for listning

  4. #4
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    Jan 2007
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    Hey again Gary,

    Although we really can't diagnose from a remote location, that does sound like a fuel delivery problem. You could rule out the possibility of an ignition problem by checking for spark after the engine dies (it's easier, too).

    Hmmm, illustration 15.6 that I referred to was shot on our project vehicle, which was a 1999 Concorde with a 2.7L engine (I checked our archives). The 2001 Concorde factory service manual doesn't shed any light either, it just says to disconnect the fuel line at the rear of the fuel rail, which correlates with our info. It does look like that fitting is very difficult to get to.

    You know, we don't like to recommend replacing parts without finding the root of a problem, but it might be easier and cheaper to drop the fuel tank and replace the filter than to obtain the special adapter for the pressure gauge, and get the gauge hooked up. If the vehicle has a lot of miles on it, it wouldn't hurt anyway (you might even find that the sock filter on the pump intake is clogged with sediment - it's always nice to find something obvious like that!).

    Good luck and let us know what you find.

  5. #5
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    May 2009
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    Default Fuel pressure ok, Computer intermittant

    After 2 service facilities had a shot at the problem, the third one determined it to be an intermittant fault in the computer module. The idle speed could be changed or terminated by banging on the computer module with the fist. Connectors or the wiring harness were ruled out.
    Replacement of the computer module solved all problems.
    This was a real hair raiser.
    Thanks for your sincere attemps to help.

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    4,850

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    Hi Gary,

    Glad you got it sorted out. When the "black box" is the source of the problem, it's usually fixed by process of elimination. Banging on the module is a good tip . . . thanks for sharing that.

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