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Thread: Cannot hit torque of 203 ft-lbs on 95 corolla strut bolts. Will Loctite work?

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  1. #1
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    30

    Default Cannot hit torque of 203 ft-lbs on 95 corolla strut bolts. Will Loctite work?

    hello to all haynes techs. once again i'm running into a slight dilemma working on my car. i have manual 92036, and I hit a pothole recently and now my driver side strut mount support is beginning to crack. the struts (all 4 of them) are only 2 years old, so this morning i took out the strut with my impact gun and replaced the strut mount with a new one and new piston rod nut. that went fine. i had an impossible time torquing down the strut to steering knuckle nuts to the absurd 203 ft lbs torque spec as per your manual states. i'm not a big guy and because of the angle, i'm actually pushing the torque wrench UP. i got to 170 ft lbs and could not get any tighter even using antiseize on the bolt threads. would it be better if i just hold the NUTS and tighten the BOLTS down instead? that way i'd be pulling and not pushing , thus having more leverage. or should i just put loctite thread locking compund on the threads and leave it at 170 ft lbs? i cant imagine them coming loose at that spec of 170, but nobody is around to help me. what do you suggest? your input is kindly appreciated gentlemen.

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    4,850

    Default

    Hello Grendal,

    We're glad that you contacted us regarding this issue. We're glad to hear that part of your project has gone smoothly -this is good. Regarding the strut fasteners, it is extremely important to adhere to the torquing standards set by the manufacturer. This is a safety issue. Moroever, anti-seize compond is not recommended for the strut-to-steering knuckle fasteners. We strongly suggest that the fasteners be removed and cleaned of all anti-seize compond. In your particular situation, you might seek professional assistance for the final tightening of these fasteners. Or, find someone with experience and expertise to assist you. We believe that safety is paramount during and after your project. We hope that you can find a safe solution to complete your project.

  3. #3
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    30

    Default

    thanks for the response. here's an update of what i did: the car drove fine even with the 170 ft lbs torque spec, but i blasted most of the antisieze off with brake parts cleaner as per your recommendation. then i took it to the dealer to get a wheel alignment. i asked the tech to check the tightness of the bolts, he said there was no isssues. just for my reassurance though, he did a quick hit of the bolts with his air gun, then did the alignment, test drove it and said it rides "great". i then got into almost a 10 minute discussion with him about torque specs on cars. he said the only things the techs really use a torque wrench for are cylinder head bolts and transmission rebuilding. that's it. WOW. they dont torque axle nuts, transmission pan bolts, strut bolts or lug nuts (although they do use torque sticks for those). very interesting to hear this from a tech who works at a dealership. just thought i'd share how my project went. thanks again for the tips i think i'll buy a 3/4 drive torque wrench in the future, those are at least 30 inches long!!! i can torque ANYTHING with that kind of leverage!!!!

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
    Posts
    4,850

    Default

    Hello Grendal,

    We're glad to hear that your project went smoothly. We'd like to think that most technicians will adhere to the recommended torque specifications on nearly every job that they do -especially those regarding suspension parts because of safety. You might want to get more opinions from other technicians... One thing to keep in mind is that experienced technicians can probably get very close to a torque value by using hand tools, but not using air tools... We can almost guarantee that your lower strut fasteners are NOT tightened to the proper specification. We recommend using the factory given torque specification. Thanks for letting us know your experience.

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