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Thread: cowboy

  1. #1

    Default cowboy

    I have a '93 Ford F150 with a 5.0 engine and an automatic transmission, my problem is the truck has an oil pan gasket leaking. My haynes manual and a few other people I've talked to say that you have to jack up the engine and put wood blocks under it to remove the oil pan. However, someone on another forum said that if it's just the oil pan gasket leaking that you don't need to jack up the engine, all you need to do is just lower the oil pan down onto the crossmember remove the old gasket slide a new gasket around the oil pump ( with the sealant on it of course) line the the gasket up with the holes on the oil pan and reinstall the oil pan. Can this procedure be done this way? Do I have to go through all the trouble of jacking up the engine etc? All it is is just the oil pan gasket. Please help.

    Thank you,
    cowboy

  2. #2
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default

    Hello cowboy,

    You could try it without raising the engine. The issue is clearance. By raising the engine, more clearance is gained and that makes replacing the gasket a lot easier.

  3. #3

    Default cowboy

    Thank you administrator, I may try that.

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default

    Keep in mind, though, that it's important to get those gasket mating surfaces clean (otherwise the new gasket might leak, too), and it might be kind of hard to do that without removing the pan (plus, you don't want chunks of old gasket falling into the pan.

  5. #5

    Default cowboy

    Thanks again administrator. Yeah, I'm having second thoughts about not raising the engine for the reasons you mentioned. One concern of mine is removing the bolts from both exhaust manifolds without breaking the bolts off. Any suggestions here? One thing I've thought about doing is taking the truck to a local muffler shop and ask them if they can break the bolts loose for me. Does this sound like a good idea too you? I'm also wondering if I can clean the gasket mating surfaces with a pnumatic die grinder. Will the die grinder mess anythig up? It seems to me the die grinder will make the process easier and faster. But I don't know. What do you think about using a die grinder?

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    Default

    Hello cowboy,

    We suggest gaining as much access as possible which inevitably means raising the engine. Regarding rusted exhaust fasteners, apply lots of penetrating fluid and allow it to sit overnight. Use 6 point tools on the fasteners and be very careful using hand tools as the fasteners may break. Having a shop do it is a good idea because they are experienced with this sort of thing. Regarding rotary tools, keep in mind that cleanliness is key; you don't want any debris getting into the engine from the work that you do on the oil pan. And, it's also easy to damage mating surfaces if you're not extremely careful. If you keep these things in mind, you should be fine.

  7. #7

    Default

    Ok, thanks again. You've been a huge help.

    Cowboy

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Jan 2007
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    4,850

    Default

    Our pleasure Cowboy! Good luck and let us know how it goes.

  9. #9

    Default cowboy

    I will definetly let you know how it turns out. I plan to tackle this project in the next few weeks. I want to also add that I'll also go ahead and replace the oil pump while I'm at it. The reason I'm doing this is because the only other time in my life I removed an oil pan was on my fisrt vehicle which was a '66 Ford shortbed Custom Cab pickup with a 352 engine and 3 speed standard transmission. The truck had been my grandpa's. Anyway, I had to remove the oil pump in order to remove the oil pan. My uncle told me that I'd better replace the oil pump while I was at it but I was 20 years old and knew it all. Anyhow, I got it put back together and the oil pump went out, I damn near locked up the engine. I had to drop the oil pan again and replace the oil pump. I tell you that was a hard lesson learned and I do not wish to do it again. So I'll be replacing the oil pump too.

  10. #10

    Default cowboy

    I just want to correct a spelling error in my previous posting the word"fisrt" is supposed to be "first" the '66 Ford pickup was my first vehicle.

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